Review: The Only Gold

Image Credit: goodreads.com

Image Credit: goodreads.com

Jonah Woolner’s life is wisely directed like the bank where he vigorously works. It’s a fantastic life until he’s neglected for promotion because of the new recruit that goes by the name of Reid Hylliard. Hasty and venturesome, Reid overwhelms everybody aside from Jonah, who’s persuaded Reid’s dynamic thoughts could be the bank’s ruin. At the point when Jonah starts to find there’s something else entirely to Reid than meets the eye, he dangers succumbing to Reid’s charms—however opening the way to the majority of Reid’s mysteries could bring him down a perilous way.

Losing his promotion and his heart, is the slightest of Jonah’s troubles. At the point when the vindictive child of a Union armed force vet plummets upon the bank to take an administration store of a large portion of a million dollars amid the deadliest tempest to ever clear New York, Jonah and Reid are caught, at odds and battling for their lives.

The book is composed from Jonah’s POV and right from the first sentence – “Jonah was late” – one can see that he’s a man who lives on his nerves. Exceptionally able, exact, composed, he takes after schedules by heart and is as fastidious in his way to deal with his dress, his conduct and his ethics as he is to representing the bank’s cash and accounts. That he is attracted to other men is something he has curbed just like an appalling variation. Life is continuing as arranged and his energies are limited to the renown of the bank and his place inside of it. He is all around enjoyed by his staff, however he is to some degree, not too sociable, and as associate clerk, he is plainly esteemed by the bank’s Board Members. He knows his place and is content with it yet now the clerk has resigned he is expected a stage up and is certain of accepting it. He is expecting advancement, yet this desire doesn’t appear to be happening, all thanks to the new comer Reid.

Beyond the story, I would like to comment on the cover of the book. I have a somewhat of a “thing” about spreads or covers so pardon me if I dwell on it in my review. It truly merits seeing in the pop out rendition on the grounds that I don’t think the craftsman, has overlooked anything. Spreads are so imperative as a hit on potential readers and frequently one doesn’t welcome the fine detail until well into the book. This one is warm and inviting with two great figures whose wonderful expressions yet uncontrollably varying positions and designs get over the amiable threat with which they at first view one another. Out of sight is the enormous romanesque building design that recommends that the bank’s financial establishments are likewise shake strong, then a window with driving snow past and a shadowy secret figure in outline that I can’t exactly make out.

The period subtle element of the dress of Reid and Jonah are taken straightforwardly from the depictions in the book and appear spot on to me. Unquestionably a cover that made me feel the need to read on.

You should all read on and find out what happens with this love-hate relationship they will spark.